Archive for the ‘Online Works’ Category

The Decorators

For their Stanley Picker Fellowship project Portal Tables, The Decorators reflect on the paradoxical way in which the pandemic has both vilified microbes and prompted a renewed interest in homemade practices of nurturing microbial life. 

Portal Tables examines the political and ecological dimensions of food and domesticity, working with artists and the local community throughout the pandemic. Taking the idea of commensality – eating together – and extending it beyond the human, Portal Tables considers how microbial bodies participate in such encounters.

Portal Tables will unfold over the course of 2021 as a series of tables, performances and films, beginning with a video-essay in May 2021. Watch the trailer here:

The Decorators is an interdisciplinary design collective founded by Suzanne O’Connell, Carolina Caicedo, Xavi Llarch Font and Mariana Pestana in 2011. With backgrounds in landscape architecture, spatial design, curation and psychology, they work on spatial design projects that aim to reconnect the physical elements of a place with its social dimension.

Film credits Directed & Edited Sergio Marquez | Written by The Decorators & Sergio Marquez | Graphics & Motion Design Stephen McLaughlin | Original Soundtrack Maxwell Sterling | Sound Mixing Maxwell Sterling

Online Salon III: Oreet Ashery, Nadia Hebson & Judy Rabinowitz Price

Thursday 18 March 2021

Join us to hear Oreet Ashery, Nadia Hebson and Judy Rabinowitz Price in conversation with each other, for the third in our series of Online Salons to facilitate exchange and dialogue between the creative community around the Gallery. Each of the three artists has created significant bodies of work over recent years that have (re)considered the lives and work of other women artists.

Oreet Ashery is a former Stanley Picker Fellow whose award-winning web series Revisiting Genesis premiered at her Fellowship exhibition in 2016. Nadia Hebson is an artist based in Stockholm, who over the past year has been the Dorich House Museum Studio Resident remotely, and recently published her contribution to Dora: Dialogue’s on Women’s Creative Practice and ThinkingJudy Rabinowitz Price‘s recent exhibition at the Gallery The End of the Sentence presented her research on Holloway Women’s Prison.

The first two Online Salons featuring Larry Achiampong, Maeve Brennan & Erika Tan and Dani Admiss, Ben Judd & The Decorators are now available to watch in full online.

Online Salon II: Dani Admiss, The Decorators & Ben Judd

Thursday 17 December 2020

The Stanley Picker Gallery is delighted to host the second of its new series of Online Salons to facilitate exchange and dialogue between the creative community around the Gallery.

With COVID-19 changing how we operate as a cultural venue, our digital platforms have become ever more vital as ways of engaging with each other and with our audiences. We hope these gatherings will enhance our role as an “expanded studio”, where creative work is shared during its production, by inviting practitioners to gather online to share their working practice in an informal manner.

The second Online Salon features three of our current of Stanley Picker Fellows Dani AdmissThe Decorators and Ben Judd. They will be in conversation with each other about their Fellowship projects which are all collaborative in nature, draw on the Gallery’s locality in Kingston Upon Thames, and engage with our local community in different ways. Each project is at a different stage of development, so this will also be an opportunity for them to reflect and discuss the impact COVID-19 has had on their practices.

Dani Admiss is a curator and researcher working across the fields of design, art, technology and science. Her approach is framed by world-making practices and community-based research prioritising these as lenses to explore alternative forms of curatorial practice. Admiss has curated projects across the UK, Europe and internationally including at the Barbican Centre, Somerset House, MAAT, Lisbon and Lisbon Architecture Triennale.

The Decorators is an interdisciplinary design collective founded by Suzanne O’Connell, Carolina Caicedo, Xavi Llarch Font and Mariana Pestana in 2011. With backgrounds in landscape architecture, spatial design, curation and psychology, they work on spatial design projects that aim to reconnect the physical elements of a place with its social dimension.

Ben Judd is an artist based in London. His work examines collectivity and participation through performance, moving image and installation, enabling different forms of communities to be explored in relation to site and context. He often works with collaborators as a method to develop self-reflexive folk histories and construct temporary communities. Judd has exhibited widely in the UK and abroad, recently including ICA, Art Night London, Whitstable Biennale and Victoria Gallery & Museum, University of Liverpool.

Online Salon I: Larry Achiampong, Maeve Brennan & Erika Tan

Thursday 26 November 2020

The Stanley Picker Gallery is launching a new series of Online Salons to facilitate exchange and dialogue between the creative community around the Gallery.

With COVID-19 changing how we operate as a cultural venue, our digital platforms have become ever more vital as ways of engaging with each other and with our audiences. We hope these gatherings will enhance our role as an “expanded studio”, where creative work is shared during its production, by inviting practitioners to gather online to share their working practice in an informal manner.

The first Online Salon features three of our current of Stanley Picker Fellows, Larry Achiampong, Maeve Brennan and Erika Tan, who will be in conversation with each other about their Fellowship projects and how COVID-19 has impacted their studio practices.

Larry Achiampong is an artist whose solo and collaborative projects employ imagery, aural and visual archives, live performance and sound to explore ideas surrounding class, cross-cultural and post-digital identity. Achiampong is a 2018 Jarman Award-nominated artist and a 2019 Paul Hamlyn Award recipient (for Visual Arts) and has worked with major institutions on commissions, residencies and exhibitions with spaces including Tate Galleries, the Venice and Singapore Biennales, Somerset House and Transport for London.

Maeve Brennan is an artist based in London. Her practice explores the political and historical resonance of material and place. Working primarily with moving image and installation, she develops long-term investigations led by personal encounters. Brennan has recently had solo exhibitions at Wäinö Aaltonen Museum, Finland (2019); Jerwood Space, London; Mother’s Tankstation, Dublin (both 2018); The Whitworth, Manchester; Spike Island, Bristol and Chisenhale Gallery, London (all 2017). She was the recipient of the Jerwood/FVU Award 2018.

Erika Tan is an artist and curator whose work is primarily research-led and manifests itself in multiple formats such as moving image, publications, curatorial and participatory projects. Tan’s work has been exhibited, collected and commissioned internationally including: The Diaspora Pavilion, (Venice Biennale 2017); Artist and Empire (Tate Touring, National Gallery Singapore 2016/7); Come Cannibalise Us, Why Don’t You (NUS Museum, Singapore 2014); There Is No Road (LABoral, Spain 2010); Thermocline of Art (ZKM, Germany 2007); Around The World in Eighty Days (South London Gallery / ICA 2007); The Singapore Biennale (2006); Cities on the Move (Hayward Gallery, London). Recent curatorial projects include Sonic Soundings/Venice Trajectories.

Artist Talk: Judy Price in conversation with Mo Mansfield and Mandy Ogunmokun

Wednesday 21 October 2020

To coincide with The End of the Sentence at Stanley Picker Gallery, artist Judy Price hosted an online conversation with Mo Mansfield and Mandy Ogunmokun about the issues affecting women in prison and the impact of the pandemic on this sector.

Since the closure of Holloway Women’s Prison in 2016, Price, Mansfield and Ogunmokun have been involved in the coalition group Reclaim Holloway, which has been actively campaigning for a Women’s Building to be included in the redevelopment of the former prison site. Reclaim Holloway have been working closely with Islington Council, the Community Plan For Holloway (CPFH) and grassroots organisations on the Women’s Building – a service hub helping vulnerable women stay out of the criminal justice system, a transformational space for the local community, and a positive legacy for the thousands of women held in Holloway prison over its 164-year history.

Mo Mansfield is a community organiser, advocate and feminist campaigner for prison abolition.  She has over 15 years experience working in the voluntary sector in both front-line and management positions at organisations such as Women at WISHWomen In Prison and the Women’s Resource Centre and currently works on Family Participation at INQUEST. Much of her work has focussed on providing independent support to criminalised women from a social justice perspective.  She is member of the Reclaim Justice Network; Reclaim Holloway; and is co-founder of the Holloway Prison Stories website. Mo was also part of the organising committee for Abolitionist Futures: the International Conference on Penal Abolition held in London in June 2018. Mo recently completed a MSc focussed on improving services for people with personality disorders. She is also a Visiting Research Fellow with the Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative at the Open University.

Mandy Ogunmokun joined the Rehabilitation of Addicted Prisoners Trust in September 2005 as a CARAT worker in HMP Holloway offering support in all areas of social issues as well as substance abuse. She became a senior worker within three years organising her own team of staff. Mandy has used her own journey of drug addiction and prison to inspire and motivate others and became an ambassador for both the Rapt Carat Team and the Phoenix Futures Interventions. In 2012, Mandy was awarded the honour of carrying the Olympic Torch to the Guildhall Hall and in 2013, she earned a Commendation from the Butler Trust for her dedication and skill in addressing the needs of women prisoners with substance misuse problems, going “above and beyond her role” to provide guidance and help for the women at HMP Holloway. In 2011, she established the Treasures Foundation to aid women with substance misuse issues and housing needs. Three years later, her tenacity and vision created three connecting houses in East London that are staffed day and night to provide continuous individual support for up to nine women. Mandy continues to connect with women’s prisons and help women find the treasures in themselves.

Judy Price is a London based artist who works across photography, moving image, sound and installation. A focus of her work is how art can create new perceptions of the experiences of individuals and social groups and arts’ effectiveness and relevance to collective struggles. Her practice involves extensive field research where she often draws on images and sounds from archival sources as well as from a sustained study of a place to explores sites and locations that are interweaved and striated by multiple histories, economies and forces. Palestine was an enduring focus of her work from 2004-2017.  She is course leader on the Photography (MA) at Kingston School of Art and is a senior lecturer in Moving Image (BA) at the University of Brighton. Solo exhibitions include Mosaic Rooms, London; Danielle Arnaud Gallery, London; Wingsford Arts, Suffolk; Stiftelsen 3,14 and USF Centre, Bergen, Norway. Group exhibitions and screenings include Delfina Foundation, Imperial War Museum, Barbican, Curzon Cinema Soho, Curzon Cinema Goldsmiths, ICA, Whitechapel Gallery. Price is an active member of Reclaim Holloway.

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Judy Price

As part of The End of the Sentence at Stanley Picker Gallery, artist Judy Price presents an online viewing of The Good Enough Mother (2020).

Originally conceived as a moving-image installation, the piece was commissioned in collaboration with Dorich House Museum and features a bronze sculpture of a baby by Dora Gordine (1895-1991) acquired for the first Mother and Baby Unit at HMP Holloway in 1948. The soundtrack to the film explores the incarcerated pregnancy, drawing on interviews by midwife Dr Laura Abbott, as well as the field work and research of forensic psychotherapist Pamela Windham Stewart. The script, developed with artist & writer Andrew Conio, is re-voiced by actors from Clean Break, a women’s theatre company that uses theatre to keep the subject of women in prison on the cultural radar and whose members have lived experience of the criminal justice system.

Anonymous, HMP Holloway (date unknown). Postcard courtesy Pamela Windham Stewart.

The material and spatial elements of the installation reflected those of Holloway Women’s Prison: the door height, the bench dimensions, and the carpet tiles appropriated from the prison itself. A single photograph of a small yellow fire hose plug is installed at navel height at the entrance of the installation at the Gallery and offers a close examination of some of the less obvious traces of prison control – in the event of a fire in a cell at HMP Holloway, the small yellow plug was removed from the door and a hose inserted blasting water into the cell, before allowing the inmate to evacuate.

Judy Price, Fire Plug (2020). Colour photograph.

For the duration of the exhibition at Stanley Picker Gallery, the original bronze sculpture by Gordine, on loan from the National Justice Museum, will be on display at Dorich House Museum in Kingston, Gordine’s former studio home. Installed in the upstairs gallery of the Museum, its reflection is visible in a convex mirror sourced by Price and Conio to resemble those used with the prison environment. The intervention, titled Reverie, cites psychoanalyst Wilfred R. Bion’s notion of reverie, in which the mother holds and ‘digests’ the baby’s trauma, love, hatred, and reflects back containment. The mirror, a captivating cold glass eye, does not hold, it gives back nothing. Instead, it surveys Smiling Baby and the space as a whole.

Judy Price Reverie (2020) Installation view at Dorich House Museum, Kingston University

Judy Price Reverie (2020) Installation view at Dorich House Museum, Kingston University

Judy Price Reverie (2020) Installation view at Dorich House Museum, Kingston University

One narrative that has emerged about the Gordine sculpture is that it was originally commissioned by a visitor to Holloway Prison, Rosalie Holmes. A surgeon’s wife and art enthusiast, Holmes campaigned for better conditions at the Prison during the 1930’s and 40’s. Paying for the sculpture out of her own pocket, she described the prison as a place “hungry for beauty”. The sculpture installed in the Prison’s Maternity Unit in 1948 was a second cast. The model for the sculpture appears to have been Jasmina Hamzavi (born 1946), the daughter of Abdul ‘Abdy’ Hossein Hamzavi, the Press Attaché for the Iranian Embassy in London. According to Jasmina in an interview with Dr Jonathan Black at Kingston University in 2011, her father asked Gordine to make a bronze figure of his 9-month-old daughter. The Unit was redeveloped in the 1970s and eventually closed in 2013 “due to under-occupancy”. From accounts by staff who worked at the Prison, the sculpture was not on display in the later Mother and Baby Unit but lay forgotten in an administration block until the Prison’s closure in 2016. The sculpture now forms part of the collection at the National Justice Museum in Nottingham.

Film Credits
Judy Price, The Good Enough Mother (2020). Script: Judy Price & Andrew Conio. Filming: Nelson Douglas & Judy Price. Video editing & colour grading: Nelson Douglas. Sound editing: Judy Price & Andrew Conio. Sound sweetening & design: Ben Hurd. Voice actors & scripting: Clean Break (Terri-Ann Oudjar, Edith Emenike & Jennifer Joseph). Duration 26 mins

Laura Abbott, The Incarcerated Pregnancy: An Ethnographic Study of Perinatal Women in English Prisons, unpublished thesis (2018) and Pamela Windham Stewart in various unpublished writing and recorded conversations between Stewart and Price.

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Ben Judd

The Origin considers the importance of community within a large city and facilitates meaningful exchanges between strangers, aiming to reconnect people both to each other and to their environment. Britain’s island status, both literal and metaphorical, has always been at the heart of its identity; The Origin will mirror those concerns by creating a miniature floating community that will act as a microcosm for the ways in which we co-habit, communicate and solve problems. A temporary community, an experiment in living, is exciting and relevant because it embraces the propositional; the ‘what if’ – it can be seen as a rehearsal for an alternative future. The idea of a classless, stateless, humane society based on common ownership feels particularly poignant within the current climate. The Origin aims to reconsider ideas of hope, love, solidarity, care and support – values that will shape this community’s identity. 

#TheOriginKingston

In Summer 2020, Stanley Picker Fellow Ben Judd collaborated with local residents, community groups, students and academics to develop ideas for an adaptable floating structure The Origin which will travel along the River Thames. Due to COVID-19, this project took place online. Participants were  invited to contribute to aspects of the community such as costume, narrative, movement, music, engagement with the local environment, and use of the boat.

The online version of the floating resource ran for six weeks throughout June and July on these pages.

Each week is dedicated to a specific subject area at Kingston University and a local community group. Both groups use the online space to develop a particular aspect of the project’s community, identity and legacy by uploading content onto these pages, developing a dialogue and collaboration between the two groups. You can also follow the activities at #TheOriginKingston on Instagram & Twitter.

Week 1 (1 – 7 June) Fashion & The Gate

Week 2 (8 – 14 June) Creative Writing & The Bradbury

Week 3 (15 – 21 June) Dance & The Grange

Week 4 (22 – 28 June) Music & Refugee Action Kingston

Week 5 (29 – 5 July) Sustainable Design & Mill St Residents’ Association

Week 6 (6 – 11 July) Interior Design & Canbury and Riverside Association (CARA)

Ben Judd

Ben Judd is based in London. His work examines collectivity and participation through performance, moving image and installation, enabling different forms of communities to be explored in relation to site and context. He often works with collaborators as a method to develop self-reflexive folk histories and construct temporary communities. Judd has exhibited widely in the UK and abroad, recently including ICA, Art Night London, Whitstable Biennale and Victoria Gallery & Museum, University of Liverpool.

MSc Project Management for Creative Practitioners

Collaborating with Ben Judd is a team of four students from the postgraduate course MSc Project Management for Creative Practitioners at Kingston School of Art. They are project managing the initial online phase of The Origin; each student using their strengths to manage unique elements of the project:  Sofia Torres – Social Media, Ching-Fang Wu – Online Content, Oshan Fenlon-Wilson – Events and Charlotte Addy – Project Integration.

Artist Talk: Judy Price in conversation with Pamela Windham Stewart

Wednesday 19th February 2020

The End of the Sentence presents artist Judy Price’s research into the history of Holloway Women’s Prison. The exhibition reflects on the impact of the criminal justice system on women and features new work by Price, archival material, and artists and writers invited by Price including Erika Flowers, Hannah Hull, Nina Ward, Katrina McPherson, Carly Guest and Rachel Seoighe. The project draws on networks, collaborations and relationships developed through Reclaim Holloway, which has been actively campaigning for a Women’s Building on the former prison site since 2016.

As part of The End of the Sentence, Price presents a new moving image installation in collaboration with Dorich House Museum, which features a bronze sculpture of a baby by Dora Gordine (1895-1991) commissioned for the Mother and Baby Unit at Holloway Women’s Prison in 1948. The soundtrack to the film explores incarcerated pregnancy, drawing on the writing and fieldwork of midwife Dr Laura Abbott and forensic psychotherapist Pamela Windham Stewart. The script is re-voiced by actors from Clean Break, a women’s theatre company whose members have lived experience of the criminal justice system. For the duration of the exhibition at Stanley Picker Gallery, the original bronze sculpture, on loan from the National Justice Museum, will be on display at Dorich House Museum in Kingston, Gordine’s former studio home.

Pamela Windham Stewart has worked for over twenty years as a psychotherapist in several prisons, including HMP Holloway, where she has developed and facilitated therapy groups for mothers and babies who are incarcerated. Pamela lectures widely and is the founder of the Saturday Forensic Forum. She has a private practice and is a clinical supervisor. With Jessica Collier, she co-edited The End of the Sentence: Psychotherapy with Female Offenders (Routledge, 2018) from which the title of the exhibition is borrowed. This seminal book documents the rich and varied psycho-therapeutic work undertaken by dedicated specialists in HMP Holloway, and the often difficult environment where attempts to provide psychological security were often undermined by conflicting ideas of physical security.

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Cold Protein with Ed Atkins, Malak Helmy & Zadie Xa

Cold Protein is a free, downloadable podcast series of artists’ sound works, conceived to be experienced in specific physical locations.

Bringing together the foundational principles of augmented reality with the digital medium of podcast radio, Cold Protein invites artists to create site-specific sound pieces for places where a physical manifestation of their work may not be likely. In turn, audiences are invited to download the episode and visit the relevant site for the full experience of the work.

Cold Protein is curated by Stella Bottai and Lucia Pietroiusti. This first series is supported by Jerwood Charitable Foundation as part of the Site Line digital commissioning programme with Stanley Picker Gallery. The podcast logo was designed by Kingston University Graphic Design graduate Stacie Woolsey.

Don’t know how to get a podcast?

A podcast is essentially a radio show that you can get on the internet, so you can listen any time you want.

You have two options:
You can listen to a podcast through a website (this is called streaming). Or, you can download a podcast, which means you’re saving it on your phone, or tablet, or computer, and you can listen to it anytime, even without an internet connection. Cold Protein is currently available on streaming and will soon be available as a downloadable podcast.

To stream: Visit the coldprotein.today episode page you want to listen to, and click the play button.
To download: Get it delivered to your phone or tablet using an app.

Disclaimer: Please be aware that Cold Protein is not responsible for and does not guarantee your entrance to the locations. Access is at the discretion of each individual site, and subject to their opening hours, T&C and ticketing (if applicable).

coldprotein.today

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New Music New Functionalities:

Curated by Yuri Suzuki and Disegno
Friday 6 April 2018
at the Design Museum

An evening of talks and performances exploring the intersection between contemporary design and music, New Music New Functionalities examines the work of a series of practitioners breaking new ground within music and sound design. Yuri Suzuki will be joined by the product designer Vahakn Matossian from Human Instruments, a company that produces high-quality musical instruments for people with physical disabilities, and the artist Imogen Piper, whose ‘Encoded Revolt’ is a musical composition derived from the co-ordinates of airstrikes in Syria. The evening will feature a rendition of ‘Encoded Revolt’, as well as a live performance by the celebrated musician John Kelly, a member of the British Paraorchestra. New Music New Functionalities is part of a wider series of performances and talks curated by Yuri Suzuki and the quarterly design journal Disegno to celebrate Suzuki’s Furniture Music exhibition at Stanley Picker Gallery.