Archive for the ‘Uncategorised’ Category

Online Salon I: Larry Achiampong, Maeve Brennan & Erika Tan

Thursday 26 November 2020

The Stanley Picker Gallery is launching a new series of Online Salons to facilitate exchange and dialogue between the creative community around the Gallery.

With COVID-19 changing how we operate as a cultural venue, our digital platforms have become ever more vital as ways of engaging with each other and with our audiences. We hope these gatherings will enhance our role as an “expanded studio”, where creative work is shared during its production, by inviting practitioners to gather online to share their working practice in an informal manner.

The first Online Salon features three of our current of Stanley Picker Fellows, Larry Achiampong, Maeve Brennan and Erika Tan, who will be in conversation with each other about their Fellowship projects and how COVID-19 has impacted their studio practices.

Larry Achiampong is an artist whose solo and collaborative projects employ imagery, aural and visual archives, live performance and sound to explore ideas surrounding class, cross-cultural and post-digital identity. Achiampong is a 2018 Jarman Award-nominated artist and a 2019 Paul Hamlyn Award recipient (for Visual Arts) and has worked with major institutions on commissions, residencies and exhibitions with spaces including Tate Galleries, the Venice and Singapore Biennales, Somerset House and Transport for London.

Maeve Brennan is an artist based in London. Her practice explores the political and historical resonance of material and place. Working primarily with moving image and installation, she develops long-term investigations led by personal encounters. Brennan has recently had solo exhibitions at Wäinö Aaltonen Museum, Finland (2019); Jerwood Space, London; Mother’s Tankstation, Dublin (both 2018); The Whitworth, Manchester; Spike Island, Bristol and Chisenhale Gallery, London (all 2017). She was the recipient of the Jerwood/FVU Award 2018.

Erika Tan is an artist and curator whose work is primarily research-led and manifests itself in multiple formats such as moving image, publications, curatorial and participatory projects. Tan’s work has been exhibited, collected and commissioned internationally including: The Diaspora Pavilion, (Venice Biennale 2017); Artist and Empire (Tate Touring, National Gallery Singapore 2016/7); Come Cannibalise Us, Why Don’t You (NUS Museum, Singapore 2014); There Is No Road (LABoral, Spain 2010); Thermocline of Art (ZKM, Germany 2007); Around The World in Eighty Days (South London Gallery / ICA 2007); The Singapore Biennale (2006); Cities on the Move (Hayward Gallery, London). Recent curatorial projects include Sonic Soundings/Venice Trajectories.

Artist Talk: Judy Price in conversation with Mo Mansfield and Mandy Ogunmokun

Wednesday 21 October 2020

To coincide with The End of the Sentence at Stanley Picker Gallery, artist Judy Price hosted an online conversation with Mo Mansfield and Mandy Ogunmokun about the issues affecting women in prison and the impact of the pandemic on this sector.

Since the closure of Holloway Women’s Prison in 2016, Price, Mansfield and Ogunmokun have been involved in the coalition group Reclaim Holloway, which has been actively campaigning for a Women’s Building to be included in the redevelopment of the former prison site. Reclaim Holloway have been working closely with Islington Council, the Community Plan For Holloway (CPFH) and grassroots organisations on the Women’s Building – a service hub helping vulnerable women stay out of the criminal justice system, a transformational space for the local community, and a positive legacy for the thousands of women held in Holloway prison over its 164-year history.

Mo Mansfield is a community organiser, advocate and feminist campaigner for prison abolition.  She has over 15 years experience working in the voluntary sector in both front-line and management positions at organisations such as Women at WISHWomen In Prison and the Women’s Resource Centre and currently works on Family Participation at INQUEST. Much of her work has focussed on providing independent support to criminalised women from a social justice perspective.  She is member of the Reclaim Justice Network; Reclaim Holloway; and is co-founder of the Holloway Prison Stories website. Mo was also part of the organising committee for Abolitionist Futures: the International Conference on Penal Abolition held in London in June 2018. Mo recently completed a MSc focussed on improving services for people with personality disorders. She is also a Visiting Research Fellow with the Harm and Evidence Research Collaborative at the Open University.

Mandy Ogunmokun joined the Rehabilitation of Addicted Prisoners Trust in September 2005 as a CARAT worker in HMP Holloway offering support in all areas of social issues as well as substance abuse. She became a senior worker within three years organising her own team of staff. Mandy has used her own journey of drug addiction and prison to inspire and motivate others and became an ambassador for both the Rapt Carat Team and the Phoenix Futures Interventions. In 2012, Mandy was awarded the honour of carrying the Olympic Torch to the Guildhall Hall and in 2013, she earned a Commendation from the Butler Trust for her dedication and skill in addressing the needs of women prisoners with substance misuse problems, going “above and beyond her role” to provide guidance and help for the women at HMP Holloway. In 2011, she established the Treasures Foundation to aid women with substance misuse issues and housing needs. Three years later, her tenacity and vision created three connecting houses in East London that are staffed day and night to provide continuous individual support for up to nine women. Mandy continues to connect with women’s prisons and help women find the treasures in themselves.

Judy Price is a London based artist who works across photography, moving image, sound and installation. A focus of her work is how art can create new perceptions of the experiences of individuals and social groups and arts’ effectiveness and relevance to collective struggles. Her practice involves extensive field research where she often draws on images and sounds from archival sources as well as from a sustained study of a place to explores sites and locations that are interweaved and striated by multiple histories, economies and forces. Palestine was an enduring focus of her work from 2004-2017.  She is course leader on the Photography (MA) at Kingston School of Art and is a senior lecturer in Moving Image (BA) at the University of Brighton. Solo exhibitions include Mosaic Rooms, London; Danielle Arnaud Gallery, London; Wingsford Arts, Suffolk; Stiftelsen 3,14 and USF Centre, Bergen, Norway. Group exhibitions and screenings include Delfina Foundation, Imperial War Museum, Barbican, Curzon Cinema Soho, Curzon Cinema Goldsmiths, ICA, Whitechapel Gallery. Price is an active member of Reclaim Holloway.

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Week 6

What will the community’s home, the boat, look like? How will it function as an adaptable, transformable space that allows the onboard group to grow and develop? BA Interior Design students at Kingston School of Art are producing innovative responses to these questions, and Canbury and Riverside Association will use this space to develop ideas and a dialogue around how this resource could be used, responding to the needs and aspirations of local people. The resulting architectural intervention will be built on and inside the boat, facilitating meetings, workshops and performances in autumn 2020.

Check back to this page to see the progress of the project!

Click here to access an interactive 3D walkthrough of BARBEL and PARSLI’s design. Vectorworks created by Dan Lacatus, BA Interior Design. 

BA Interior Design (12 July)

BARBEL and PARSLI

BARBEL and PARSLI

BA Interior Design (11 July)

 

BARBEL and PARSLI

BARBEL and PARSLI

BA Interior Design (10 July)

KSAqua

BARBEL and PARSLI

BARBEL and PARSLI

Amidship Design

Canbury and Riverside Association (9 July)

BA Interior Design (9 July)

Three More

BARBEL and PARSLI

BARBEL and PARSLI

Amidship Design

BA Interior Design (8 July)

Offshore

KSAqua

BARBEL and PARSLI

BARBEL and PARSLI

Amidship Design

Canbury and Riverside Association (7 July)

BA Interior Design (7 July)

KSAqua

BARBEL and PARSLI

Amidship Design

Canbury and Riverside Association (6 July)

BA Interior Design (6 July)

BARBEL and PARSLI

BARBEL and PARSLI

Canbury and Riverside Association

CARA is a non-political and voluntary organisation whose aims are the protection and enhancement of amenities within CARA area for the benefit of residents and visitors. Canbury Gardens, the park at the heart of CARA area, is popular and its facilities are well used. CARA volunteers campaign on key issues facing the area and organise occasional social events and projects, such as planting daffodils along the riverside. For more information visit Canbury and Riverside Association’s website.

CARA hopes that initially we can discuss and debate online the design and uses of the spaces on the boat developed by Kingston School of Art Interior Design. This resource (both online and the physical boat) we expect to be used to discuss and reflect on ideas that concern our community. It might become an alternative local meeting space, a stage or an open-air studio.

KSA Interior Design

“We investigate the existing, interrogate a problem, playfully speculate solutions, tell stories, create desires and bring designs to an innovative material & spatial resolution”

The BA Interior Design course at Kingston provides a creative environment for students and staff to rethink our constructed world; speculating how it can become more habitable, meaningful and sustainable. Our aim is to create environments & interactions that meet the needs & enrich the experience of modern life. Places that resonate with contemporary culture, anticipate change & enter into a meaningful dialogue with our past. Based on an in-depth understanding of people, materials, space and light our students learn how to craft environments that give meaning, form and identity to a rapidly changing world. We believe that Interior Design is a collaborative, social activity and we benefit from working with artists, entrepreneurs, manufacturers, community groups, developers, local authorities, brands and state institutions. Partnerships that enable us to explore the challenges of the future. Our graduates currently work at leading studios; creating environments, experiences and identities for major brands, seeking beauty in how things are made and remade and inventing spaces that tell stories and bring complex ideas to life. For more information visit our course website and Instagram.

Our part in The Origin project will be to provide a welcoming space accessible to all communities using the boat. The design both on top and inside is a unification of two designs from separate groups – BARBEL and PARSLI – made up of Level 5 Interior Design students Alexandra Miškufová, Isobel Dungey, Lucy Bildstein, Freya Chapman, Megan Prior and Rosie Pryor.

By exploring aspects of the river over time and local history, geography, urban development, and social change, we will reflect on how this can accommodate the needs and responses of the onboard community. The outcome of our communication throughout the week with CARA will ultimately contribute to how the boat is used. We hope the online dialogue will enhance the research and designs we have so far produced for the boat during the academic year. 

Other groups’ designs are also featured on this page, including: Amidship Design, ArkStudio, KSAqua, Offshore, Team Athelstan, Zindasign and 3Moor.

Week 5

How does the onboard group engage with their local environment and how does this impact on how they function as a community? Students from MA Sustainable Design at Kingston School of Art and Mill Street Residents’ Association will take us on a journey along the tributary Hogsmill River, which runs from Stanley Picker Gallery to the Thames where the boat will be located. On this journey we will engage with the Hogsmill, a point of origin of the Thames, as well as with the local landscape, finding things of interest along the way. Using this page and #TheOriginKingston on social media, they will reflect on how these ideas of locality can be explored on the boat and ultimately develop aspects of the onboard community, informing how the boat will be used in autumn 2020.

This week’s collaboration is in partnership with International Youth Arts Festival’s Digifest, taking place online 3-5 July 2020. 

Check back to this page to see the progress of the project!

KSA Sustainable Design (5 July)

Himali Patil

Mill Street Residents’ Association (4 July)

Victor (aged 7)

KSA Sustainable Design (4 July)

Nil Atalay

KSA Sustainable Design (3 July)

Himali Patil

Nil Atalay

KSA Sustainable Design (2 July)

Eleanor Pile

Himali Patil

KSA Sustainable Design (1 July)

Himali Patil

Nil Atalay

Mill Street Residents’ Association (30 June)

Helen

KSA Sustainable Design (30 June)

Eleanor Pile

Nil Atalay

KSA Sustainable Design (29 June)

Himali Patil

Eleanor Pile

Mill St Residents’ Association

The Mill Street Residents Association (MSRA) was created several decades ago in order to foster community, to plan local fundraising events, and to preserve this special little street in Kingston. There is a committee of local residents who meet on behalf of the wider street community organise events like a very popular beer and sausage festival, Easter egg hunt, and nights out. We also help with issues that are important to local residents, from parking to speeding cars on our little street, to relations with the wider community. For more information visit Mill St Residents’ Association’s website.

KSA Sustainable Design

We are the MA students from Sustainable Design. We are going to provide designed social content for this project to engage different communities and groups with the platform. We will consider various aspects during the design process such as localization, inter-generational connection, open visual languages for all, engaging activities and volunteerism. We are going to compile all of our ideas to support the Gallery’s website with graphics, visuals and research.

Week 4

What does the onboard community sound like, how do they express themselves and how do they communicate with each other and with the outside world? Refugee Action Kingston and KSA Music will use this space to produce new music, both instrumental and choral, that seeks to define the group’s core identity through sound. Reflecting on how the group might explore ideas of being both together and apart, these aural experiments will be further developed in workshops on the boat and become part of the onboard performances in autumn 2020.

Check back to this page to see the progress of the project!

KSA Music (28 June)

Ying Liang

Holly Smith, Louisa May Pope and Zuzanna Wężyk

KSA Music (27 June)

Holly Smith – Drifting. The story behind it is that there is a storm, and the earth splits and the pieces drift, but then the storm calms and the earth slowly drifts back towards itself, and two people run towards each other and embrace.

Refugee Action Kingston (25 June)

Farhang Nekoei-Rizi – Dreams. I am from Iran and I have been in the UK for about three years. I play a traditional musical instrument called Tombak (drum), which is made of wood and animal skin – this piece was composed in response to the project. 

Refugee Action Kingston (24 June)

Mahmoud Omari – River Dreams. I play an instrument called the Oud and I studied music at the conservatoire of Damascus. I composed this piece in response to Zuzanna’s Waters of Kingston. Water is a source of life and inspiration. Watching the River Thames flow through Kingston brings peace. How I wish my loved ones left behind could be here with me to see what I see.

KSA Music (24 June)

Zuzanna Wężyk

KSA Music (23 June)

Zuzanna Wężyk – Waters of Kingston. Performing this piece, I was imagining the Thames near Kingston. Currently, I am in Poland so I cannot be there. The resonating effects of the composition could illustrate nostalgia and hope at the same time.

Refugee Action Kingston (22 June)

Zakaria Abdul Razak

Playlist:

Mo’ein Sharif – Syrian singer
Song: Ta’ab El Meshwar (The journey is tired)

“Where is the path taking us
And to which shore is it taking us
Oh sea ..Leave us on the harbor
Keep us young ..leave us young”

Farid Al Attrach – Syrian-Egyptian composer, singer, virtuoso oud player, and actor
Song: Alashan Malesh Ghairak (because I have no one but you)

“I tried to forget you and I forgot my heart with you”

George Wassouf – Syrian singer
Song: Ana msafar Ya Ummi (I am travelling, Oh Mother)

“I am travelling, Oh mother,
Tell me goodbye”

Warda Aljaza’iriya/Warda the Algerian – Algerian singer, sometimes referred to as the Algerian Rose
Song: Khallik Hena (Stay here)

“Goodbye
I am not afraid anymore in this life of anything else
But the goodbye
And Being lost
I know what being lost is when you are far away”

Fairouz – Lebanese singer
Song: Ehkili 3an Baladi (Tell me about my country)

“Tell me, Tell me about my country tell me,
O breeze passing by the tree facing me
Tell me story about my family, a story about my house
Tell me a long story about my childhood neighbour”

Mohamed Abd El Wahab – Egyptian singer, actor, and composer
Song: Men Gheir Leh (Without a why)

“Without a why
We come to the world without knowing why
Or where we are heading
Or what we want”

Refugee Action Kingston

This group is funded by Love Kingston to deliver an inter-generational learning programme. Under lockdown, we have concentrated on providing contact and support and resources for families to be more creative and to have some fun away from the stress of home schooling. Children have been able to do art, crafts, read, play games and grow strawberries and other vegetables. For more information visit Refugee Action Kingston’s website, Twitter @KingstonRefugee and Facebook Refugee Action Kingston.

KSA Music

Zuzanna Wężyk is a guitarist, singer, composer and songwriter. In January 2020, she obtained her master degree in Composing For Film TV at Kingston University. Zuzanna is member of Kingston University Stylophone Orchestra and she collaborates with collaborative project, Acid Grass Records. For The Origin she is involving Kingston University students and graduates in building her musical composition. Instagram: @muzotok, Facebook: Zuzanna Wężyk and YouTube: Zuzanna Wężyk.

Week 3

How might the onboard community move, how might they express fundamental ideas of closeness and distance through physical interaction? The Grange and KSA Dance are using this space to experiment with different forms of movement, as well as the sign language Makaton, to develop a choreographic sequence that explores core aspects of the group’s identity; this will be revisited in onboard workshops and will ultimately be performed on and around the boat in autumn 2020.

Check back to this page to see the progress of the project!

The Grange and KSA Dance (21 June)

Zoom movement workshop with members of The Grange and KSA Dance.

KSA Dance (21 June)

Nichelle Franklin – Dance improvisation to a Ted Talk speech about community.

The Grange (20 June)

Makaton Sign Language

KSA Dance (20 June)

Nichelle Franklin – I am responding to the word distance. I created abstract movements that represent each letter in the word distance. Towards the end I explored movements close and further away from the body.

Caroline Lofthouse

KSA Dance (19 June)

Louisa Pope

Dr Beatrice Jarvis

The Grange and KSA Dance (18 June)

Zoom movement workshop with members of The Grange and KSA Dance.

KSA Dance (18 June)

Dr Beatrice Jarvis

The Grange (17 June)

Rosemary developing a sequence based on Makaton sign language.

Makaton Sign Language

KSA Dance (17 June)

Isobel Cook and Alexandra Fryer – Together through social distancing. This piece explores the ways in which dance brings people together and how we feel through a time of separation and social distancing. Through the use of social media, dance and art you can feel metaphorically close to people whilst having physical distance between you.

The Grange (16 June)

Jo developing a sequence based on Makaton sign language. 

KSA Dance (16 June)

Immaculate Lubega – BLM. Exploring the themes of community and togetherness, I was inspired by the current events in the world and I have used to opportunity to show my support through movement as a black woman. This is the time we need to stand up and fight for the lives of black people and uplift each other in any way possible, but above all, LOVE each other.

Dr Beatrice Jarvis

Dr Beatrice Jarvis – Still movement. A short reflection upon distance and separateness. A short improvisation exploring a sense of drawing into the body and releasing. Using the idea of gathering from our surroundings, holding everything we can close; this improvisation plays with the simple idea of the body as an archive; holding experience and releasing it through movement.

The Grange (15 June)

Abi developing a sequence based on Makaton sign language. 

Makaton Sign Language

KSA Dance (15 June)

Isobel Cook and Alexandra Fryer – Together Through Social Distancing. This piece explores the ways in which dance brings people together and how we feel through a time of separation and social distancing. Through the use of social media, dance and art you can feel metaphorically close to people whilst having physical distance between you.

The Grange

We are a charity based in Bookham supporting people with disabilities to lead independent & fulfilling lives. The Grange wants to lead the way as provider of choice for people with learning disabilities, inspiring our local and wider communities. Our Group Living service is designed for people with moderate learning & physical disabilities who need 24/7 care and support. We do everything we can to ensure our clients are personally involved in any decisions that affect them. In our Supported Living care, you have your own flat or bedsit for which our clients are responsible. Our Support Workers help them develop their skills so that they can live in their own home with as much independence as possible. The Grange has a dynamic, award-nominated range of skills training & sports and leisure activities for people with learning and physical disabilities.​ For more information visit The Grange’s website, Instagram @thegrangeatbookham, Twitter @TheGrangeCentre or Facebook The Grange at Bookham.

KSA Dance

For our Digital Dance Residence as part of The Origin, we will be coming together to make solo and group online improvisations around the key themes of community, togetherness, separateness, closeness, distance. Working with these ideas alone and together in a range of dance styles and movement practices; we will work to explore the notion of a digital supportive dance community; in which we support, nurture and challenge each other through supported improvisations. Making use of digital platforms we will readdress what it means to be a dance community and also how we can utilise and apply our dance practices and trainings to address our current moods, mindsets and emotions through movement. Our intention is to curate a safe, opening and welcoming space where through our movements and stillness, breath and gesture we can share, activate and communicate together as we navigate new ways of being together.

Kingston University’s dance degree offers a diverse and exciting curriculum by combining critical and creative practice. Students study a diverse range of global dance styles; developing their own unique dance identity by exploring areas such as choreography, dance technique and performance, cultural dances, teaching dance and event management. Students work collaboratively; in placements; in the local community and in work across a wide range of performance styles. The dance course also capitalises on London’s vibrant multicultural dance scene and encourages students to address the social and political implications and applications of their forming dance practice. For more information visit the course website.

Students from KSA Dance: Akeino James, Alex Fryer, Anya Handzel, Immaculate Lubega, Izzy Cook, Jakub Ujczak, Lauren Woollard, Louisa Pope and Olivia Hutton.

KSA Dance team members leading collaboration with L4, L5 and L6 students are:

Dr Beatrice Jarvis: urban space creative facilitator, choreographer and researcher, and founder of the Urban Research Forum and The Living Collective. Drawing from Somatic practices and working extensively with improvisation; Beatrice works across a diverse range of community settings both nationally and internationally to explore through site-based and studio practices; the social power and potential of embodied movement practices. Her socio-choreographic research has been profiled within Pina Bausch Symposium, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, dOCUMENTA (13), National School of Art Bucharest, Galway Dance Festival, Goldsmiths CUCR Tate, and AAG. Her commissions include GroundWorks Jerwood Space, Steven Lawrence Center and EGFK Berlin. For more information visit her website.

Caroline Lofthouse: a senior lecturer in Dance and a founding member of staff in the Dance Department at Kingston University. With a BA (Hons) in Contemporary Dance and an MA in Dance Training and Education both from London Contemporary Dance School, she has worked in dance for over 20 years. Before Kingston, she performed extensively with Loop Dance Company, working with choreographers such as Jonzi D, Yael Flexer and Filip Van Huffel. She has worked for Richard Alston Dance Company and was a faculty member at London Contemporary Dance School, Roehampton University and London Studio Centre. She is also an Associate Artist with Candoco Dance Company. For more information visit her website.

Week 2

What is the story behind the onboard community, what is its origin? How did they come into being, what are their beliefs, aspirations and desires? The Bradbury and Writers’ Centre Kingston are using this space to produce texts and poetic responses that consider the Thames as an elemental force, the locality and its history, as part of the backstory of the group. These ideas will be developed in workshops on the boat, leading to performances that will embody the community, taking place onboard in autumn 2020.

Check back to this page to see the progress of the project!

Writers’ Centre Kingston (14 June)

SJ Fowler

Silje Ree

Maria Val De Los Rios – Togetherness

Writers’ Centre Kingston (13 June)

SJ Fowler

Silje Ree

Maria Val De Los Rios – Stateless Classless

Maria Val De Los Rios

The Bradbury (12 June)

Jim Dunk

Writers’ Centre Kingston (12 June)

Simon Tyrrell

The Bradbury (11 June)

Lily Jenkins

Writers’ Centre Kingston (11 June)

SJ Fowler

The Bradbury (10 June)

Lily Jenkins

Writers’ Centre Kingston (10 June)

SJ Fowler

The Bradbury (9 June)

Lily Jenkins

Writers’ Centre Kingston (9 June)

SJ Fowler

The Bradbury (8 June)

Jim Dunk

Writers’ Centre Kingston (8 June)

Julia Rose Lewis

The Bradbury

The Bradbury offers a lively, vibrant and inclusive atmosphere, with a wide range of activities from Tai Chi and Yoga, to dancing classes or computer lessons, for the active over 55s, operated by Staywell. For more information visit The Bradbury’s website.

Writers’ Centre Kingston

Writers’ Centre Kingston is Kingston University’s literary cultural centre dedicated to creative writing in all its forms, with an annual programme of events from talks to workshops and festivals, directed by Steven J Fowler.

Twitter: @writerskingston

Week 1

What will the onboard community look like and what will they wear? The Gate and KSA Fashion are using this space to develop costumes for the people who will inhabit the boat as well as for the performances which will take place on and around the boat in autumn 2020. Taking inspiration from the Thames, its history, the local environment, as well as alternative groups who have suggested a new way of living, the contributors are experimenting with material and form to develop adaptable, transformable clothing. 

Check back to this page to see how they progress!

 

The Gate (7 June)

Produced by a member of The Gate

KSA Fashion (7 June)

Meerim Mamatova

Meerim Mamatova

Meerim Mamatova

Eimear Kennedy

Eimear Kennedy

Klaudia Proskornicka

Klaudia Proskornicka

The Gate (6 June)

Produced by a member of The Gate

KSA Fashion (6 June)

Sayeon Kim

Sayeon Kim

Izzy Oldland

Erin Fairall

Erin Fairall

Erin Fairall

The Gate (5 June)

Produced by a member of The Gate

KSA Fashion (5 June)

Meerim Mamatova

Meerim Mamatova

Yusun Lee: Yusun was directly influenced by the triangular architecture of the boat that will be on the River Thames. By studying movements he designed interesting patchwork costumes that represent the diversity of a community.

Yusun Lee

The Gate (4 June)

Produced by a member of The Gate

KSA Fashion (4 June)

Meerim Mamatova: Meerim was inspired by the deconstruction of existing garments and performance art for her designs.

Daisy Gray - Development: Recycling a broken inflatable bed and crocheting an old bedsheet lead Daisy to her costume sketches.

Daisy Gray - Development

Daisy Gray - Development

Daisy Gray - Development

Izzy Oldland

Izzy Oldland

The Gate (3 June)

Produced by a member of The Gate

KSA Fashion (3 June)

Sohyun Lee - Development

Sohyun Lee

Sohyun Lee

Sohyun Lee

Joana Dias: Joana tests different approaches of incorporating knitwear into the costume. Here in shape of headpieces made from stockings.

Sebastian Nissl - Suit

Sebastian Nissl - Triangle 1

Sebastian Nissl - Triangle 2

The Gate (2 June)

Produced by a member of The Gate

KSA Fashion (2 June)

Eimear Kennedy Design 1: Influenced by the isolation of living on an island, Eimear based her designs on Celtic symbols and macramé.

Eimear Kennedy: Celtic symbols and her own experience with islands lead to Eimears impressive seaweed prints.

Milica Ceklerevac: Milica took a closer look at the Kingston heritage and life on a boat, which inspired our designs to be transformable.

Milica Ceklerevac

Milica Ceklerevac - Development 3: Knotting and tying used in shipping applied to the performance pieces.

Milica Ceklerevac

The Gate (1 June)

Produced by a member of The Gate

KSA Fashion (1 June)

Sebastian Nissl: Inspired by the work of The Gate and with the performance in mind Sebastian recycled an old T-shirt of his to create fringe for his costume approach. Creating new materials and surfaces from what is accessible for the community.

Sebastian Nissl: Deconstructing class defining garments like a suit jacket to create individualised performance pieces for a classless, stateless and humane society. This approach reflects on what certain clothing symbolise and to giving them a new meaning.

Klaudia Proskornicka: The Kibbo Kift wanted to lead civilisation out of social collapse, create a new culture and lead to a new world. This message is very similar to ours.

Klaudia Proskornicka - Development 2

Klaudia Proskornicka

Sebastian Nissl: To personalise the costumes in every way Sebastian thought about recycling pull rings, which were collected by veterans, to create individual embroidery.

The Gate

The Gate is an arts and resource centre for people with learning disabilities based in Shepherds Bush, London. Largely we’re an arts centre but we see ourselves as a base where people can come and be free to be themselves and express that in a creative manner and we think there should be a Gate on every street corner, for everyone. For more information visit The Gate’s website and Instagram @54thegate

KSA Fashion

We are a collective of BA Fashion students with a special interest in this art project and performance. In direct collaboration with Ben Judd and the help of two MA Fashion alumni we are designing costumes that are influenced by our cultural, social and historical research. With the importance of community in focus we want the costumes to manifest a sense of belonging together. Our goal is to create performance pieces that generate a meaningful environment for the public to share their stories and encourage the evolution of our society.

Group Members: Izzi Oldland, Erin M. Fairall, Meerim Mamatova, Milica Cekerevac, Zainab Qureshi, Milli D. Welsh, Eimear M. Kennedy, Dharyl E. Usina Pantoja, Sayeon Kim, Sohyun Lee, Rachel Hall, Hester R. Cooper, Klaudia Proskornicka, Joana Santos Moreira Dias, Daisy I. Gray, Yu Zhao, Rebecca G. Wong, Yusun Lee, Sebastian M. Nissl, Maria Piene, Caroline M. Alexander. For more information about Fashion at Kingston School of Art, visit their website.

Artist Talk: Judy Price in conversation with Pamela Windham Stewart

Wednesday 19th February 2020

The End of the Sentence presents artist Judy Price’s research into the history of Holloway Women’s Prison. The exhibition reflects on the impact of the criminal justice system on women and features new work by Price, archival material, and artists and writers invited by Price including Erika Flowers, Hannah Hull, Nina Ward, Katrina McPherson, Carly Guest and Rachel Seoighe. The project draws on networks, collaborations and relationships developed through Reclaim Holloway, which has been actively campaigning for a Women’s Building on the former prison site since 2016.

As part of The End of the Sentence, Price presents a new moving image installation in collaboration with Dorich House Museum, which features a bronze sculpture of a baby by Dora Gordine (1895-1991) commissioned for the Mother and Baby Unit at Holloway Women’s Prison in 1948. The soundtrack to the film explores incarcerated pregnancy, drawing on the writing and fieldwork of midwife Dr Laura Abbott and forensic psychotherapist Pamela Windham Stewart. The script is re-voiced by actors from Clean Break, a women’s theatre company whose members have lived experience of the criminal justice system. For the duration of the exhibition at Stanley Picker Gallery, the original bronze sculpture, on loan from the National Justice Museum, will be on display at Dorich House Museum in Kingston, Gordine’s former studio home.

Pamela Windham Stewart has worked for over twenty years as a psychotherapist in several prisons, including HMP Holloway, where she has developed and facilitated therapy groups for mothers and babies who are incarcerated. Pamela lectures widely and is the founder of the Saturday Forensic Forum. She has a private practice and is a clinical supervisor. With Jessica Collier, she co-edited The End of the Sentence: Psychotherapy with Female Offenders (Routledge, 2018) from which the title of the exhibition is borrowed. This seminal book documents the rich and varied psycho-therapeutic work undertaken by dedicated specialists in HMP Holloway, and the often difficult environment where attempts to provide psychological security were often undermined by conflicting ideas of physical security.

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