Archive for the ‘Fellowships’ Category

Dani Admiss

Dani Admiss is a curator and researcher working across the fields of design, art, technology and science. Her approach is framed by world-making practices and community-based research prioritising these as lenses to explore alternative forms of curatorial practice.

Admiss will be exploring histories of contamination and ideas of purity, through micropollutants caused by the abundant use of chemicals in our daily lives. Her Fellowship project Cycles of Toxicity is a collaborative fabulation that brings together various communities to retrace the lives of chemical pollutants as they travel through bodies and ecosystems. 

Admiss has curated projects across the UK, Europe and internationally including at the Barbican Centre, Somerset House, MAAT, Lisbon and Lisbon Architecture Triennale. 

Larry Achiampong

Larry Achiampong is an artist whose solo and collaborative projects employ imagery, aural and visual archives, live performance and sound to explore ideas surrounding class, cross-cultural and post-digital identity. For his Fellowship project, Achiampong will develop a new multimedia public realm work that centres the testimonies of womxn of colour, particularly those of the African diaspora who are especially vulnerable to harm through institutional, economic and structural marginalisation. The focus of his project is to elevate their stories, histories, agencies and ambitions through collaborative practice and intergenerational research.

Achiampong is a 2018 Jarman Award-nominated artist and a 2019 Paul Hamlyn Award recipient (for Visual Arts) and has worked with major institutions on commissions, residencies and exhibitions with spaces including Tate Galleries, the Venice and Singapore Biennales, Somerset House and Transport for London.

Maeve Brennan

Maeve Brennan is an artist based in London. Her practice explores the political and historical resonance of material and place. Working primarily with moving image and installation, she develops long-term investigations led by personal encounters.

For her Stanley Picker Fellowship, Brennan’s proposal focuses on the illicit antiquities trade; working collaboratively with forensic archaeologist Dr Christos Tsirogiannis, the project will trace international underground networks that facilitate the looting, smuggling and selling of cultural artefacts.

Brennan has recently had solo exhibitions at Wäinö Aaltonen Museum, Finland (2019); Jerwood Space, London; Mother’s Tankstation, Dublin (both 2018); The Whitworth, Manchester; Spike Island, Bristol and Chisenhale Gallery, London (all 2017). She was the recipient of the Jerwood/FVU Award 2018.

Ben Judd

Ben Judd is based in London. His work examines collectivity and participation through performance, moving image and installation, enabling different forms of communities to be explored in relation to site and context. He often works with collaborators as a method to develop self-reflexive folk histories and construct temporary communities.

For his Stanley Picker Fellowship, Judd will collaborate with students from Kingston School of Art to create an offsite project using the nearby River Thames as the site for a floating resource for the local community that reflects upon Britain’s island status. 

Judd has exhibited widely in the UK and abroad, recently including ICA, Art Night London, Whitstable Biennale and Victoria Gallery & Museum, University of Liverpool. 

The Decorators

The Decorators is an interdisciplinary design collective founded by Suzanne O’Connell, Carolina Caicedo, Xavi Llarch Font and Mariana Pestana in 2011. With backgrounds in landscape architecture, spatial design, curation and psychology, they work on spatial design projects that aim to reconnect the physical elements of a place with its social dimension.

The Decorators’ projects can be read as the testing of possible infrastructures for communal life, designing programmes and physical elements for a space that turns an individual into a collective. In particular they have produced tables, seating configurations and frameworks for collective eating. Commensality – eating and drinking at the same table, is a fundamental social activity, which creates and cements relationships, but which can also defy dominant power structures. For The Decorators, the act of eating is a political act.

During their fellowship they want to consolidate this experience and build an inventory of objects and situations that produce collective experiences based on the consumption of food. By staging a series of design experiments both in and outside of the Stanley Picker Gallery, in collaboration with students and the local community, The Decorators seek to develop a series of observations, situations and working sculptures which they will exhibit, use, photograph, draw and compile into a catalogue of (political) commensality.

Erika Tan

Erika Tan is an artist and curator whose work is primarily research-led and manifests itself in multiple formats such as moving image, publications, curatorial and participatory projects; she is a lecturer in Fine Art at Central Saint Martins College of Art (London) and a member of Asia-Art-Activism.

Tan’s most recent research has focused on the postcolonial and transnational, working with archival artifacts, exhibition histories, received narratives, contested heritage, subjugated voices and the transnational movement of ideas, people and objects; her future projects point towards the digitization of collective cultural memory and cloud architecture through the prism of ruins, hauntings, and mnemonic collapse.

Tan’s work has been exhibited, collected and commissioned internationally including: The Diaspora Pavilion, (Venice Biennale 2017); Artist and Empire (Tate Touring, National Gallery Singapore 2016/7); Come Cannibalise Us, Why Don’t You (NUS Museum, Singapore 2014); There Is No Road (LABoral, Spain 2010); Thermocline of Art (ZKM, Germany 2007); Around The World in Eighty Days (South London Gallery / ICA 2007); The Singapore Biennale (2006); Cities on the Move (Hayward Gallery, London). Recent curatorial projects include Sonic Soundings/Venice Trajectories.

 

Revital Cohen & Tuur Van Balen

Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen are London based artists working across objects, installation and film, exploring processes of production as cultural, social and political practices. Recent exhibitions include Para Site Hong Kong, The 7th Moscow Biennale,Kunstverein Düsseldorf, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Fotomuseum Winterthur, HKW in Berlin and the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo. Recent screenings and talks include the ICA in London, TENT Rotterdam and Congo International Film Festival in Goma. Their work is part of the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York and M+ Museum in Hong Kong.

Over the course of their fellowship, Cohen & Van Balen will develop a new body of work looking at gambling as a symptom of the contemporarycondition. Working with writers, psychologists and economists, they will explore gambling as a state of mind, a prominent gesture, practice and ideology in both contemporary politics and art; manifestation of delusion, grandeur and the belief of fantasy materialising. Through experiments with language, systems, situations, objects and bodies, their project will question why times of uncertainty call for irrational behaviour.

Michael Marriott

Born and based in London, Michael Marriott has been working as a designer since 1993. Trained as a furniture designer, which forms the core of his practice, but also includes exhibition, product and interior design projects. In all his varied practice there is a common core though, which is a search for the elemental nature of the thing in hand.

He is known for making supremely well detailed and highly functional objects, renowned for their keen and economical grace. He recently launched his first injection moulded product, a wall mounted coat hook, named after the Anglo-Hungarian architect Ernö Goldfinger, and now available through online shop woodmetalplastic.com

During his Fellowship, he will investigate alternative means of marking and colouring plywood – one of the materials he employs most extensively in his work – with methods that don’t rely on brush strokes, screenprinting or out-sourced services.

Cally Spooner

Cally Spooner (b. 1983) is an artist and writer born in London, where she is currently based. Her work consists of media installations, essays, novels and live performances such as radio broadcasts, plays and a musical, which grapple with the organisation and dispossession of that which lives. She often uses rehearsals, or the episodic form, as a means, and an end, in itself. Recent solo shows include New Museum, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2016); she has participated in numerous group exhibitions, including Aspen Art Museum, and REDCAT, Los Angeles (2015). Her essays/writing have appeared in Flash Art and Artforum; her book of scripts is published by SlimVolume (2016) and she is the author of the novel, Collapsing In Parts published by Mousse.

Over the course of her Fellowship research, Spooner will seek a cross-disciplinary exchange with Kingston University’s Schools of Humanities; Performance and Screen Studies; and the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), to unpack the politics, ethics and economics of collaboration in the creative industries. Operating both practically and academically, her Fellowship will become groundwork for the formation of a more or less functional performance company. Through study-groups, networking, publishing and knowledge building, Spooner’s research activities will explore and test models of generative, collective production, alongside analysis of contemporary states of management and power; directorial presence, authorial absence, the trusting in (or harnessing of) the genius of one’s ‘cast’.

Yuri Suzuki

Yuri Suzuki (b. 1980) is a sound designer and electronic musician born in Tokyo and based in London. Suzuki’s projects explore the realm of sound, interaction and electronics through designed objects. Since 2013, he teaches at the Royal College of Art in London and works as an associate for Disney, New Radiophonic Workshop and Teenage Engineering. Suzuki is the founder of Yuri Suzuki Ltd (YS Lab), an R&D consultancy working with companies including Google, Panasonic and Disney. His works OTOTO and Colour Chasers were acquired by MoMA in 2014.

Suzuki’s design practice raises questions around our relationship to sound, and how music and sound may affect people’s minds. He is interested in how contemporary products and infrastructures remain often under-developed in their sound features, while being highly refined in terms of visual design and technology. Suzuki will use his Stanley Picker Fellowship to work with Kingston University’s teaching staff and students to investigate the psychological and physical agency of sound and explore how more thoughtfully designed soundscapes could improve our daily lives. By staging a series of design experiments, workshops and interviews in collaboration with sound practitioners, including musician Matthew Herbert among others, Suzuki will seek to develop a number of designed products proposing new ways in which sound can inhabit the everyday.

Yuri Suzuki’s Stanley Picker Fellowship Edition Acid Brexit – a 7″ Limited Edition Blue Vinyl is now available to listen to and watch online, and purchase on vinyl from 1 March 2019.